Home » 2014 (Page 2)

2014

Library Instruction Goes BYOD

By Lindsey Gumb, Instructional Technology Librarian

 

The Library Instruction Lab, or more affectionately referred to as the LIL by library staff, not only has a new home on the third floor of the Learning Commons, but it also is chock full of new equipment for interactive learning.

So what exactly has changed? For one, we’ve transitioned from the traditional classroom model of forward-facing rows and hardwired computers to a wireless laptop and tablet-based environment that also allows for BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) access. The tables are now on wheels, which creates opportunities for more individualized instruction and group work depending on class size and needs.

 

DSC_4918

If you’ve attended a research instruction session this semester, perhaps your librarian utilized the projector to lead you through the library’s resources, or, maybe your class was presented using the new IWB (interactive white board). The 65 inch Samsung IWB is a Windows-based touch-screen computer that has the ability for the instructor to annotate and capture still image and video files during instruction. The librarians are still testing the waters with the IWB to determine how the technology might best be incorporated into their pedagogy with research instruction. Stay tuned for more LIL updates and developments as the semester progresses!

 

LIL Space

So what exactly has changed? For one, we’ve transitioned from the traditional classroom model of forward-facing rows and hardwired computers to a wireless laptop and tablet-based environment that also allows for BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) access. The tables are now on wheels, which creates opportunities for more individualized instruction and group work depending on class size and needs.

What is OneSearch?

By Susan McMullen, Research Services and User Engagement Librarian

 

OneSearch is a user-friendly method of searching across the HELIN Library Catalog AND the full-text of much of RWU Library’s electronic holdings. OneSearch streamlines your research process by giving you just one place to search for topics instead of hunting out specific research databases. Use OneSearch to discover millions of books, eBooks, scholarly articles, newspapers, sound recordings, DVDs, government documents and online videos. You can limit your search to find exactly what you need.

What’s included in OneSearch?

  • All the materials in the HELIN Library Catalog, such as books, government documents, and DVDs.
  • Scholarly journal articles, newspaper and magazine articles from the library’s research databases, such as Academic Search Complete, JSTOR, and Science Direct.
  • E-books from collections such as eBrary, eBook Academic Collection from EBSCOhost, Project Muse, Oxford University Press, and others.
  • Resources from the Library’s digital collections, such as DOCS@RWU.

Search features:

  • Facets in the left column allow you to limit your search by format, location, date, content provider and more.
  • Limit your search results to the HELIN Catalog only OR to scholarly “peer-reviewed” articles only.
  • Export citations directly to RefWorks.
  • Link to the full bibliographic record by clicking on the item’s title in the results list.
  • Open full text articles by selecting PDF or Full Text at RWU

Off Campus Access:

  • Make sure you log in to see all of your results. The Log in link is found in the top right corner. Just enter your name and library barcode. Your barcode is found on the back of your student ID.
  • OneSearch is mobile phone friendly.

How to Search:

Enter your search terms in the search box located on the Library home page, then limit your results to meet your research needs. Facets for limiting your search are in the left hand column and can be selected and deselected as desired.

You may wish to limit to

  • the HELIN Catalog only
  • Articles and more (online resources including ebooks)
  • RWU
  • Online videos or another material format
  • By date range
  • By content provider (database)

onesearch screen 1

 

Articles will link directly to the full-text if it is available at RWU. If an article is not available you will see a link to fill out an interlibrary loan request.

 onesearch screen 2

 

Behind the Book: The Rebel Wife by Taylor Polites

polites_merriBy Abby DeVeuve

Recently, I met with Taylor Polites, author of the historical fiction novel The Rebel Wife, and author of stories appearing in Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting and Providence Noir. Originally from Alabama, Taylor has lived in places such as New York City and Provincetown, before recently settling in Rhode Island. He teaches in the Wilkes University Creative Writing MFA Program, at the Rhode Island School of Design, and occasionally teaches creative writing courses at Roger Williams University. I wanted to learn more about him and his inspiration for writing and creating art. On November 18, 2014, as part of the Talking in the Library Series, Taylor will be part of a discussion panel with RWU history professor Jeffrey Meriwether titled “From the Stacks to the Pages: How Research Tells the Stories from History.”

From the start, Taylor was gregarious and animated as we sat down to talk at the Seven Stars Bakery in Providence. He was happy to discuss his work with me and share his inspiration for writing and creating.

“I am interested in place, and I find that wherever I am, I’m naturally tuning into the setting and my surroundings,” Taylor said, as we talked over coffee and cookies in the warm bakery in Providence, on what was on otherwise chilly fall day. Providence, where he currently calls home, provides a wealth of creative inspiration for both literature and other forms of art for Taylor. He is interested in both the history of the city and the current vibrant, intellectual city life surrounding him. That atmosphere was evident all around us as we chatted inside the busy coffee shop. We were surrounded by people talking animatedly, just like us, or sitting quietly to read and work even in din of conversation. The place had a unique, artistic vibe that lent itself to our conversation about Taylor’s creativity.

History and place have inspired Taylor’s sense of creativity throughout his life even before he lived in Providence. When asked about the inspiration for his first novel, The Rebel Wife, he said his hometown of Huntsville, Alabama was his greatest influence.

“Growing up and seeing these antebellum homes and the way people talked about the war, even though it was 150 years ago, had a real effect on me and I was fascinated by this period of history from a very young age. So I began creating my own towns and drawing maps of the towns,” said Taylor.

Because he was so interested in creating houses and towns, he decided to try architecture in college. However, he soon realized “it wasn’t really the houses that were as interesting to me as the people who lived in the houses. So these imaginary towns, these houses, all of this became a place for me to create stories.”

He told me that The Rebel Wife is the result of his urge to tell stories about the people in the towns he created, using his hometown in Alabama as a historical source. This novel features a strong female protagonist, as Taylor was also influenced by strong heroines in the books he read while growing up. Set in 1875 at end of Reconstruction, the novel tells the story of woman from a family that was ruined by the Civil War, whose husband has just died, and who believes she will inherit money and be in control of her own life. But that all comes crashing down. rebelwifepic

“She begins to think about the stories that she’s been told and the things that she’s been told to believe and compare that to her lived experience and the experiences of the people in the house with her, who are former slaves seeking agency in their own ways,” explains Taylor.

By setting up the novel this way, Taylor explains that he wants to examine the tension between myths, stories, and the way people remember something versus the academic perspective of historians trying to tell an objective version of history. He says that the atmospheric backdrop of the end of Reconstruction gives him the opportunity to explore themes of conflict, upheaval, racism, and the devastation of the war through one woman’s very personal story.

Tension and conflict are not themes that Taylor shies away from in his writing; in fact, he seeks out moments in history that feature opposing views coming together and people struggling for something. He calls these moments in history “hinges” or “turning points” that allow him to explore and ask questions, such as, “How did we get to today through these moments of tension in our history?”

Taylor is currently working on a second novel, this one set in 1860 during the eve of the Civil War, which was another period of upheaval and tension. He wants to continue to explore these provocative themes in multiple novels featuring turning points in history.

Since Taylor is well into his career as a successful writer, I asked him how he got to this point and what inspired him to become a writer. He was clearly happy with his choice, as he talked excitedly about his path to doing what makes him happy.

“The impulse to create stories was always in me. In the 5th grade I was writing plays for my English class,” Taylor said. But when he went to college he felt pressure to get a job and thought pursuing writing would be crazy. Since he also loves history, he majored in history as a way to tell stories.

However, he ended up moving to New York City and working in the financial industry – but he said that the impulse to write was always there and it did not go away.

“At a certain point I said, ‘This urge to tell stories, and these places down in Alabama and the stories, are still alive inside me.’ And I thought, ‘I have to take a chance now, I have to put some effort toward making this a reality.’”

We discussed the fear that keeps people from pursuing their dreams and his careful planning to be able to have a career that makes him happy. He says that he went into it with a sense that it might not work, but he had to try. Now, because of taking that risk and acting upon his urge to write, he gets to write, teach creative writing, and live in a community of writers. Looking around the Seven Stars Bakery and the surrounding area, I could see why living in such a community would be so enriching.

“Everything I do has a relationship to writing and making and crafting,” said Taylor.

Taylor is much more than a writer; he is an all-around artistic and expressive person. He explains, “I can look at myself as a maker, and writing is just one component of that.”

When I asked him about how he is a maker, he told me about how the incredible arts community in Providence helped enrich his life. His neighbor is a screen printer who taught him how to screen print and make his own personal book plates. Taylor explained, “There’s a satisfaction to making something with your hands, and learning this craft opened up a new world of creating and making and having fun.”

In addition to screen printing, Taylor also knits, does antique photography, and letterpress printing. He said that these other crafts find their way into his writing, as well as an adorable inspiration of his own:

“I love my dog, Clovis, and I love knitting sweaters for Clovis, and that became the subject of an essay.” The essay about knitting sweaters for his Chihuahua appears in an anthology called Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting.

Clovis is featured in Taylor’s other artistic endeavors as well; Taylor hands out Clovis t-shirts and Clovis cards as a personal touch at events or to send thank you notes. Taylor’s career, doing what makes him happy, seems to combine all of his passions: making, writing, history, and Clovis. I was a little disappointed that Clovis couldn’t join us in the coffee shop.

When asked for tips for aspiring writers, he gave advice that reaches beyond just writing: “Being a writer is a form of play . . . that’s true for life. Anything that you do can have that spirit of wonder and play in it, and if you bring that attitude to the thing you’re doing, it’ll enrich your life so much more and open you up to the wonders around you. Then you can take advantage of what life has to offer and relish in living it.”

Come see Taylor as part of the Fall Talking in the Library Series.

Topic: “From the Stacks to the Pages: How Research Tells the Stories from History.” RWU history professor Jeffrey Meriwether and author Taylor Polites will discuss how research has informed and shaped their works in fiction and in scholarship.

When: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 (4:30 PM) in the Mary Tefft White Cultural Center in the University Library

_______________________________________________________

Behind the Book takes an in depth look at the world of the book through articles and interviews about the creative process, issues in publishing, and the writing life.

_______________________________________________________

 

 

Ideas of Order: A Close Reading of Shakespeare’s Sonnets

By Dr. Margaret Case, Chair, Department of English Literature and Creative Writing

Ideas-of-Order-A-Close-Reading-of-Shakespeare’s-Sonnets-by-Neil-L.-Rudenstine-e1415219729937Ideas of Order: A Close Reading of Shakespeare’s Sonnets by Neil L. Rudenstine

Farrar, Straus & Giroux

November 2014

Is it odd that perhaps the greatest single work of lyric poetry in English – Shakespeare’s Sonnets — is scarcely read in its entirety? What happens when Shakespeare’s sonnets are read out of context? Why are many people surprised that the first 18 of Shakespeare’s sonnets reveal Shakespeare’s love for a young man?

Neil L. Rudenstine’s Ideas of Order prompts these questions — and many others– in a manner likely to spark new engagement in the Sonnets.  Chapter one succinctly summarizes traditional scholarly warnings against reading the sonnets as a dramatic sequence. Subsequent chapters then disobey such advice, providing first an overview and then a series of extended studies of specific dramatic segments and their accompanying cast of characters: the banished poet, his beloved fair youth, his dark lady, and the rival poet.

The phrase “close reading” in the title, alongside Rudenstine’s credentials as a Renaissance scholar and former President of Harvard University, could suggest this is yet another collection of painstaking sonnet-by-sonnet analysis. In fact, however, like the sonnets themselves, Rudenstine uses order to reveal mystery.

This text draws deftly and knowledgeably from Shakespearean scholars from W.H. Auden to Helen Vendler; however, readers looking for annotations, isolated sonnet readings, or fixed interpretations will not find them. Traditional formal satisfactions, such as tracing key word shifts from quatrain to quatrain or resolving final couplets of dyadic tension into triadic balance are in this text metonymous with the dramatic trajectory of complicated emotional shifts in sentiments, surging and receding over the ostensibly temporal space of the sequence.

Rudenstine’s approach itself disrupts traditional ideas of order. Rather than “reading” the sonnets one by one, each chapter discusses one dramatic “grouping” often around raveled phrases such as “tender churl.” These chapters model what it would mean to read the sonnets within a particular dramatic array, as well as suggesting connections across the larger sequence. For example, why do these sonnets begin the way they do? Does the current sequence make sense on its own, despite what seem like lacunae, non-sequitors, (not to mention what seem like occasionally “random” sonnets)? Answering such questions, each chapter reveals connections between and/or within the segments that ring thematic changes on the overall trajectory.

Readers new to Shakespeare might especially enjoy chapter two’s succinct description of the dramatic clusters within the sonnets and the overview of the “players,” as well as the permission (nay encouragement) to read for the drama. When the reader hits “snags” in the storyline (e.g., when the love triangle begins with one man urging another to marry, or when a patron is treated without traditional sycophancy, or when the “edge of doom” signals hope), Ideas of Order reveals method within lyric madness.

Will this text transform the scholarly reader’s experience of Shakespeare’s sonnets? Quite possibly, if scholarly readers are willing to abandon decades of internalized proscriptions against approaching the sonnets as an essentially dramatic sequence.

Will this text enhance a lay reader’s first time reading of these poems? Absolutely. If any introductory work is likely to change the fact that so few people read Shakespeare’s sonnet sequence in its entirety, this is the one.

From the Nightstand: Susan Pasquarelli

Interview conducted by Ryan Monahan


Dr. Pasquarelli, Professor of Literacy Education in the School of Education, has been on faculty for 21 years.

SusanPasquarelliCurrent Reads

The Wedding Shroud: A Tale of Ancient Rome by Elisabeth Storrs fits neatly into Dr. Pasquarelli’s collection of historical fiction centered on Ancient Rome. The  story follows a Roman woman named Caecilia who, in 406 BC, has been wedded to an Etruscan noble to help create a truce between the two warring nations.Although she moved just twelve miles from Rome, the Etruscans are dramatically different than the Romans, and Caecilia must learn to adapt to a pleasure-seeking Hedonistic society.

Dr. Pasquarelli was drawn to this novel in an attempt to continue her education about Ancient Rome and Roman artwork. The Romans conquered Etruscan civilization, but many elements of Roman artwork can be traced to Etruria, located along Italy’s western coast. For Dr. Pasquarelli, Roman artwork is of high interest, as every summer she visits Rome with a group of students from RWU, exploring the history, culture, and artwork of the ancient city.

 Memorable Reads

Dr. Pasquarelli’s favorite book by Karen Joy Fowler, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, is narrated by a 22 year old girl named Rosemary, who gradually reveals more and more of her childhood relationship with her sister. Dr. Pasquarelli is adamant that those who read this book should shy away from book jacket summaries to allow the book to unfold naturally. Readers who do so will have a pleasant surprise a third of the way through the book, one that made Dr. Pasquarelli jump up onto her bed and scream aloud! Another novel from her collection of Ancient Rome, Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces by Miles J. Unger analyzes the life of the renowned Renaissance artist Michelangelo through his works of art.

Upcoming Reads      

High on Dr. Pasquarelli’s list is Ian McEwan’s latest novel The Children Act, a suspenseful novel about a devoutly religious teenage boy refusing a treatment that could save his life and the efforts of a compassionate judge to convince him otherwise. Also on her bookshelf is Dear Committee Members by Julie Schumacher, a “hilarious book about professors for professors,” which details the humdrum and woeful life of a dispirited creative writing professor.

 

_________________________________________________

What are people in the Roger Williams University community reading? The From the Nightstand team asks which books are on people’s nightstands—either being read, or waiting to be read.

__________________________________________________

 

 

 

The Emerald Light in the Air by Donald Antrim

By Kevin Marchand

The-Emerald-Light-in-the-Air-by-Donald-Antrim-e1415219824136The Emerald Light in the Air by Donald Antrim

Farrar, Strauss and Giroux

September 2014

I guess it depends on how well you wish to understand the fragility of the human mind. If the answer is not very much, then you should leave Donald Atrium’s new collection of short stories, The Emerald Light in the Air, on the bookshelf, unopened. On the other hand, if you wish to understand the daily struggles that a great number of your fellow human beings face everyday, possibly understand your own mind a bit better than you may consciously wish to, and be wildly entertained in the process then you should grab it, let the white sleeve slide to the floor and open up to page one.

Almost every one of these brilliantly crafted stories deals with a struggling artist in some sense of the word. Be it a painter, a writer, or a play director they all have their own unique set of difficulties and as you read, their torments will likely become your own.

Nearly every character struggles with sex in some way. Whether it be that they feel the need to simulate the act on stage with students, as is the case with Reginald Barry in “An Actor Prepares,” or that they don’t know who they should be doing it with or that they cannot do it with the person they love any longer, they all face the challenge in some way and to varying degrees.

In addition to their sex lives and their art, these characters struggle with the state of their consciousness on a day to day basis. A number of them take medications for depression or anxiety, a handful of them battle with excess drinking, and a couple even walk up to the brink of suicide, of believe that things could possibly be better for them on the other side. One notable example is from my personal favorite story in the collection, “Another Manhattan.” In this story, the protagonist Jim contemplates suicide throughout the entire narrative. What worries us more is that we know that he has attempted in the past.

On the outside almost all of these characters seem like normal people. People that you could sit down next to at the bar and talk to about the current economic crisis or the Red Sox’s chances of making it to the World Series. Once we get inside their minds though, we see, that they are deeply troubled individuals. Some preserve on their own—or with the help of others—and others leave of worrying about them as if they were our own brothers, mothers or cousins.

By the end of the collection, we feel as if we have learned something distinctly important about the human mind—a few things perhaps. Namely, that we don’t know the story of the person next to us. Almost everyone struggles and anyone who doesn’t to some degree simply isn’t a very thinking human being. We learn that the line between sane and insane can become thin in a matter of moments and sometimes it can never be made as strong as it once was after that happens. Most importantly, perhaps, we know for certain, upon closing this small book, that there may very well come a day when our hand is the only thing that stands between someone toeing the line and crossing over it. And of course, that someday—if not today—we could very well be toeing that very same line ourselves.

 

Announcing Talking in the Library Speakers Fall 2014

Fall 2014

October

pvenkatraman.jpgPadma Venkatraman – Writing for Young Adults: From Oceanographer to Young Adults Author

October 7, 2014
4:30 p.m.
The author of the acclaimed young adult novels Climbing the Stairs, A Time to Dance, and Island’s End. As a young child she developed a keen interest in Mathematics, Sciences and Literature. As a result of the tugof- war between her passion for the world of numbers and her passion for the world of words, she moved to the United States from India at the age of nineteen to pursue a graduate degree in oceanography. Currently she teaches at URI.

abraver.jpgAdam Braver – Lincoln in Fiction

October 28, 2014
4:30 p.m.

Adam Braver is the author of five novels, most recently Misfit, a novel about the life of Marilyn Monroe.  His books have been selected for the Barnes and Noble Discover New Writers program, Borders’ Original Voices series, the IndieNext list, and twice for the Book Sense list, as well as having been translated into multiple languages.  At Roger Williams University, he is on faculty in the Creative Writing program, and Writer-in-Residence with the University Library.

 

November

polites_merri.jpgTaylor Polites & Jeffrey Meriwether –  From the Stacks to the Pages: How Research Tells the Stories from History

November 18, 2014
4:30 p.m.
Taylor M. Polites is the author of The Rebel Wife (Simon & Schuster, 2012). His work has appeared in the anthologies Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting (W.W. Norton, November 2013) and the upcoming Providence Noir (Akashic Books) as well as in local and regional arts and news publications including Provincetown Arts, artscope, and the Cape Codder. He teaches in the Wilkes University Creative Writing MFA program, at Roger Williams University and the Rhode Island School of Design. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island with his small Chihuahua Clovis.

 

Jeffrey Meriwether is an Associate Professor of History at RWU. A U.S. Navy Reservist when he began his career at Roger Williams in 2001, Meriwether’s zeal for all things historic has only grown since he arrived in New England. In 2003, Meriwether took full advantage of the region’s colonial roots by signing on as a Revolutionary War re-enactor with His Majesty’s Tenth Regiment of Foot, one of several British regiments stationed in the Boston area during the Revolution.

 

All lectures will be held in the Mary Tefft White Cultural Center, University Library

 

Behind the Book: Padma Venkatraman

 

A Few Minutes with Padma Venkatraman

pvenkatraman-talk_Fall14By Abby DeVeuve

Padma Venkatraman is a remarkable woman who refuses to pigeonhole her passions — she has been an oceanographer, a teacher, and a novelist, among many other things. She was born in Chennai, India, and lived there until age 19, when she moved to the United States to begin her graduate work as an oceanographer. Although Padma’s initial career path was in the field of science, she has always harbored a love of literature. Even while she was conducting research around the world or working at the University of Rhode Island, she was pursuing her love of writing.

She has written math and science books, children’s books, and most recently young adult novels. For her literature she has won numerous awards and honors, including starred reviews in Kirkus, Booklist, VOYA, SLJ, and BCCB for her most recent young adult novel, A Time to Dance.

As part of the Talking in the Library series, Padma is visiting RWU on October 7 at 4:30 PM in the Mary Tefft White Cultural Center in the University Library.  But, as a sneak peek, Connecting with Your Library intern, I caught up with Padma over email to talk about Padma’s novels, her life, and her inspiring advice to young writers!

Abby: First, I want to get to know you as a person a little better — how do you spend your time?  What is a day in the life of Padma Venkatraman like?

Padma: These days I am quite limited in what I do because spending time with my husband and child is my priority, other than writing. I’m lousy at tennis but like it, I ice walk (holding on to the boards, while my family skates), do yoga every morning, and read a lot! I used to hike, snorkel, canoe, [and] cross-country ski but that was pre-child. I also did more volunteer work at that point.

Abby: Your primary occupation was in the sciences as an oceanographer, but of course you are a successful novelist as well — how do these two aspects of your life come together, or do you keep them apart? Do you use your scientific knowledge to inform your writing?

Padma: I pretty much keep them apart when it comes to writing. Science writing is by nature didactic and full of explanations – two things a good novelist avoids.

Then again, I feel science informs my life as a writer. It gives me a great appreciation for the vastness of space and time, for the immensity of the universe, and thus, I hope keeps me from getting too self-obsessed.

My scientific knowledge came into play a little in Island’s End, in which there’s a Tsunami, and which is set on islands I visited as an oceanographer. I also was, for a while, the only female of color and yet chief scientist on research cruises — that gave me an understanding of what it means to lead despite being a “minority.”

Abby: You were born in India and then moved to the United States — how have your life experiences influenced your writing?

Padma: I’m American now, and in most ways I’m more American than I’m Indian. Then again, growing up in India gave me both an understanding of the depth and largely accepting spirituality that prevails in that culture as well as an experience of the many unfortunate social restrictions and inequities. Thus far, this has heavily influenced my first and third novels, but not all my work will be set in India (if I live long enough to write more, as I hope to do).

Abby: A Time to Dance is your third and most recent novel — will you explain what it is about in your own words?

Padma: A Time to Dance is my most recent literary novel. It’s about Veda, a dance ingenue who loses her leg in an accident. As she struggles to recover physically, she grows as a person, becomes more open and giving, and discovers spirituality. Her journey is one that progresses through the 3 different stages of love, if you will — from Eros, through Charis, to an awakening of Agape.

Abby: While your novels are very different, they often feature strong female characters facing hardship on various levels– what made you want to explore these themes? What do you want readers to take away from your works?

Padma: I had a very difficult childhood, in part because I was a girl growing up in India, in part because the family I was born into is dysfunctional. When I came to the United States for graduate school at age 19, I was one of the few women in the then male-dominated profession of oceanography. I think the challenges I underwent make me gravitate toward characters who also face hardship. I invite characters I admire into my mind, strong people whose voices I can happily listen to for years on end as the novel evolves, interesting people whom I enjoy seeing in the movie that plays in my mind as I write.

Abby: What is your favorite book (or who is your favorite author) and why?

Padma: [There are] lots of authors I like, no single favorite.

Authors I admire: Kazuo Ishiguro, Vikram Seth, M.T. Anderson, Da Chen, Laurie Halse Andersen, Ursula LeGuin, Jane Yolen — because they have such a range of media that they explore [and] they write for such a wide variety of age groups or else they’ve all managed to explore different types of writing, different genres.

Some favorite books: The Wind in the Willows, Winnie the Pooh, How Green Was My Valley, A Step from Heaven, Many Stones, The Book of Daniel, Olive Kitteridge, The Case Against America, Midnight’s Children, Brideshead Revisited, The Rainbow, As I Lay Dying, East of Eden, the Gitanjali, Savitri, The Hungry Tide, Vol de Nuit, Siddhartha.

Abby: Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers or college students in general?

Padma: Three things:

 

First, truly concentrate on mastering this: Learn to love the internal rewards that writing gives you. As writers we tend to crave external awards and recognition and while I doubt we can overcome this yearning, we have to learn to at least keep it under some kind of control. Without that, you can destroy your family and forget what love is. More than taking a huge number of classes in the craft of writing, which I certainly never did (given that my training is as an oceanographer), I think aspiring writers should learn yoga and meditation —so they can at least try to meet the ups and downs of this life with somewhat greater equanimity. Life is especially hard for a writer in America if you are a person of color from Asia/South Asia, I think, because we just aren’t accepted or seen as American. Our work is always classified as “Indian” or whatever other kind of ethnicity.

 

The second thing — read. Spend more time reading than you spend writing. Read critically but never criticize a living writer in writing. Young writers may have a nonsensical notion that reading will “influence” them and steal their originality — but it can’t. And if you’re really worried about “influence” read whomever you think is a great writer and get influenced by them.

 

Third, take writing risks. Writing a book in which spiritual discovery, in a non-religious way, but nevertheless through the framework of a non-majority religion in the United States was a huge risk. Sometimes I wondered if I should just keep to the safer theme of Veda just overcoming her physical difficulty [because] that in itself is a remarkable story. But I’m glad I took up the tremendous challenge of tackling her spiritual awakening. It is the hardest thing to write — to make spirituality and the power of art concrete — but it was central to Veda’s character and her story. And thanks to my having the courage to do it, I think, A Time to Dance has received starred reviews in Kirkus, Booklist, VOYA, SLJ, and BCCB, in addition to rave reviews online and in newspapers across the nation.

 

Moral of my story: be brave, experiment boldly but don’t lose compassion when you experiment. Compassion and empathy, as well as courage, are the keys to writing well.

_______________________________________________________

Behind the Book takes an in depth look at the world of the book through articles and interviews about the creative process, issues in publishing, and the writing life.

______________________________________________________

 

 

Upcoming Books

SHORT TAKES

 

emerald_zpsaba53be9.jpgThe Emerald Light in the Air, by Donald Antrim

Farrar, Strauss and Giroux

September 2014

 

Donald Antrim’s The Emerald Light in the Air is a collection of seven stories that he’s published in The New Yorker over the past fifteen years. With stories that often tread the line between moving, funny, and absurd (in the way that life usually is), The Emerald Light in the Air will be a short story collection we are anxious to dig in to.

 

***

 

51vwJOd-r3L_zpsbea7f5c9.jpgDe Potter’s Grand Tour, by Joanna Scott

Farrar, Strauss and Giroux

September 2014

 

For her eleventh novel, Pulitzer finalist Joanna Scott creates a novel whose mysterious circumstances serve to peer into the mysterious world of marriage, fear, hope, and honor. De Potter’s Grand Tour, set at the beginning of the twentieth century, is about a tour agent and gentleman antique collector who disappears at sea. Through alternate perspectives and a variety of temporal shifts, Scott not only pieces together the story of De Potter’s disappearance, but the story of the life he created and left behind.

 

***

 

wolf_zps5f9b1f42.jpgWolf in White Van,by John Darnielle

Farrar, Strauss and Giroux

October 2014

 

Primarily, John Darnielle is known as a member of the band, The Mountain Goats. For his first novel, Darnielle imagines how a text-based role-playing game collides with real world events. Part suspense, and part psychological drama, we look forward to entering into this world where the terror of the situation also reveals the identity of the protagonist.

 

***

 

ultra_zpsfad3178a.jpgUltrasonic, by Steven Church

Lavender Ink

December 2014

 

Former RWU professor Steven Church’s fourth book is a collection of themed essays that explore how sounds (and the concept of sound) can reveal truths and understandings about the world we live in, and how we live in it. Typical Church essays explore notions of identity through considering the continuum of his own experiences (as a brother, a father, a friend, and a partner) within the context of larger cultural expectations. Always smart, insightful, and meticulously researched, Church’s lyrical essays tend to flow between humorous, generous, and painfully honest. Steven Church never skimps in his work, and for that reason we anticipate being fully engaged in Ultrasonic.

 

 

FEATURED REVIEW

 

lila_zps77025aa9.jpgLila, by Marilynne Robinson

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

October 2014

 

The eponymous hero of this short and lucid novel by Robinson fleshes out a character mostly offstage in Robinson’s 2004 Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel Gilead: the much-younger wife of Gilead‘s 76-year-old protagonist, the minister John Ames. Gilead is epistolary, taking the form of a long letter from the dying Ames to his seven-year-old son; much involves Ames’s father and grandfather, both ministers themselves. That novel is long on philosophy and shorter on action, excepting the actions of the long-ago past.

Lila receives little direct attention in Gilead; a decade later Robinson tells her story in fine prose and with a turn. Lila’s story is far less philosophical; it’s the story of a woman who has fought for survival nearly since birth and now finds herself, through events and wanderings, to be the young wife of an old, and unfailingly kind, man.

In Lila, it is the Reverend seen through her eyes, as she was through his in the earlier book. Lila as a child drifts with itinerant pickers across the Midwest, watched over by an old woman named Doll, who might have been her savior, but might also have been her kidnapper. Lila is the story of a young woman left few choices in life, who must still yet make them. The story unfolds in parts, interspersed with the story of her awkward courtship by the minister.

Lila is an excellent novel that is less prequel or addition than something of a mirror part. There is a third book of what might now be called the Gilead Trilogy, but Home (2008) is more of a spinoff, in my mind.

In reading Lila and how it fills out Gilead, I’m reminded of Evan Connell’s twin novels Mr. Bridge and Mrs. Bridge, also published a decade apart. And like those two books, Gilead and Lila work as one story in complementary testimony. Indeed, I consequently returned to a re-reading of Gilead with a new dimension and satisfying circularity.

–Edward J. Delaney

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inappropriate Behavior by Murray Farish

Milkweed Editions
March 2014

inappropriate-behavior-web2-copy_zpsb96f

While beginning Murray Farish’s first collection of short stories, Inappropriate Behavior, I did not know what to expect. Nine stories later, I was frantically searching the internet for something else—anything else—I could read by this emerging author. A mysteriously omitted tenth story, perhaps?

I ended up settling for a couple of interviews with Farish regarding his first major published work. In the interviews, Farish, who teaches at Webster University, proved to be just as enriching as the stories themselves. Perhaps most insightful was his belief that people seem to spend too much time wishing for a different reality other than their own—a theme seen in nearly all his stories. Many of the characters in Inappropriate Behavior struggle with this very issue. Their various responses are always captivating and, often times, relatable. To put it simply, if you are looking to better understand the struggles of those around you, learn a thing or two about present day America, and be entertained in the process, then you should read this collection.

After the first story, “The Passage,” it will be clear that you are in for nearly two hundred pages of memorable characters, unexpected action, and moral strengthening. Every character you meet will force you to decide whether you love or hate them. Most are so complex that they offer a sobering lesson in how easily the two emotions can rightfully coexist, while always searching and negotiating for a livable middle.

Once you travel across the open sea with the eighteen-year-old protagonist in “The Passage,” sharing a bunk with the infamous Lee Harvey Oswald, you will watch as businessmen crabwalk across the parking lot to their cars, couples become torn apart by the naked body of a teenager, and a downright cynic is punished for momentarily putting aside his cynicism.

The title story, “Inappropriate Behavior,” is saved for the finale. Murray Farish must have known that it was the most impactful story. Through the nearly forty-page journey we see, through a new lens, the crippling reality of today’s post-recession America intertwined with the formidable task of raising a child with severe mental illnesses. Regardless of who you find yourself rooting for and who you find it impossible not to root against, you won’t forget anyone you met or the struggles they endured for quite some time.

–Kevin Marchand

Order your copy of Inappropriate Behavior here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Some Desperate Glory: The First World War The Poets Knew by Max Egremont

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
June 2014

9780374280321_zps6087fe49.jpg

In tracing the poets’ war careers, it strikingly takes a series of large defeats, and the resulting hundreds of thousands killed and wounded (including some of the poets), for the mood to shift. Bitterness shines through by 1916, yet it is a bitterness about what could and should have been. This yearning for an ideal past links the second half of the war to the first, and, more importantly, maintains the the thread into the post-war years. Siegfried Sassoon’s ‘Blighters’ (1917), Isaac Rosenberg’s ‘Dead Man’s Dump’ (1917), Wilfred Owen’s ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ (1918): all of them drafting the war’s true imagery; all of them asking the difficult questions.

For those who survived the conflict, the search for an ideal past continued. An uncomplicated Edwardian England was replaced with a complex and tragic war experience. The poets’ true understanding of the war depended upon the public truly appreciating its soldiers’ sacrifices. Only with this goal reached could the poets at last find peace. The reality was that the country moved on without them. Only Robert Graves claimed to have found clarity after 1918, dismissing his war poetry as mere journalism. For the others, facing the future required living in the past.

Egremont’s Some Desperate Glory takes its title from Owen’s ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’. Edwin Campion Vaughan’s 1917 war diary (published posthumously in 1981) shares the title again. All three works therefore rest in the vein of Great War literature that casts the conflict as a forlorn hope. Egremont tackles this historical standard with a discussion of those critics who did not believe the war was as Thomas, Brooke, Rosenberg, or even Graves had described it. The conflict was terrible, yes, but to read the poets was to believe that Britian had lost. Yet, perhaps the British victory made it all the more difficult to square soldiers’ sufferings.

Nevertheless, Egremont’s book is one of a number published in the run up to the war’s centenary. All the tropes of war understanding are appearing again, with countless images of smiling soldiers off to the front and the carnage that resulted. Some Desperate Glory is there to remind us of the cost of war, but it is only good for what it is: an analysis of an event that occurred one hundred years ago. Historical analysis is also, sadly, historical interpretation. At the time the critics wondered if Sassoon was not just a glory seeker-someone who enjoyed the sound of his own voice. The poets often critiqued each other, readily pointing out the deficiencies in their colleagues, thereby fighting to claim the honor of the war’s most genuine voice. Appreciating the Great War requires us to appreciate that it was not as cleanly horrible as historical memory suggests. Importantly however, it makes the conflict all the more human.

–Dr. Jeffrey Meriwether

Order your copy of Some Desperate Glory: The First World War The Poets Knew here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Chase Us: Stories by Sean Ennis

New Harvest
May 2014

0544263006_zpsb764adc0.jpg

Chase Us, Sean Ennis’ debut book, is a collection of eleven stories about his experiences growing up in the confusing, turbulent streets of Philadelphia, at times blurring the line between fiction and memoir. Beginning when he is just 11 and progressing chronologically into adulthood, Ennis’ stories depict his childhood learning experiential lessons while roaming the streets of Philadelphia with his cohort of friends.

Taken in whole, these stories highlight the difficulties of reaching maturity in the ever-changing and fast-paced modern world. In “Saint Kevin of Fox Chase,” a teenaged Ennis barely avoids a savage beating from a rival neighborhood, but his friend Kevin isn’t as lucky; halfway through the collection, Ennis and his college roommates suffer repeated break-ins until they are forced to leave town in “This is Ambler;” and in the final story, “This is Tomorrow,” Ennis, his wife, and his child must hunker down to survive a violent tornado.

Despite the hardships, Ennis infuses his stories with satire and wit. From the discovery of “Indians” in a cage in the city park to the purchase (and ensuing mishap) of an old school bus to the plea for help from a very stoned, “kidnapped” veteran at a house party, Chase Us will leave the reader laughing out loud and asking for more.

Sean Ennis highlights not just the chaotic nature of childhood, but also the chaotic nature of the world into adulthood. Written in bouncing prose that draws the reader in, Ennis crafts a beautifully written collection that depicts childhood as simultaneously brutal and comical. With raw emotions and honest feelings, Chase Us is a poignant testament to the challenges of growing older.

–Ryan Monahan

Order your copy of Chase Us here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What Has Become of You by Jan Elizabeth Watson.

Dutton
May 2014

9780525954378_zps525d7068.jpgWhat Has Become of You captivates the reader from the first page. With cliffhangers and mysterious plot developments, Jan Elizabeth Watson’s second novel leaves the reader questioning the complex actions of the characters even past the last page.

Vera Lundy, 40 years old, pale, meek, and timid, finds herself as a substitute teacher of an all-girls school in rural Maine. The town, Dorset, has just been rocked by a tragedy – the murder of a high school girl. Although the guilty party has come forward, doubt surrounds his arrest, and tensions are high in the classroom Vera has been assigned. The theme of death repeatedly surfaces in the class discussions as Vera and her new students work their way through The Catcher in the Rye. One student in particular, the fifteen year-old Jensen Willard, connects with J.D. Salinger’s novel and with Vera on a personal level through her animated yet troubling journal entries. However, when another death rocks the town, Vera’s passion for mystery novels and her own sense of responsibility starts to take over. As the novel develops, the pace quickens and Vera finds herself sucked into the murder investigation. Following ambiguous clues and nondescript handwritten notes, Vera’s quest begins to subtly mirror that of Holden Caulfield’s journey from The Catcher in the Rye.

As What Has Become of You unfolds, and Vera begins to peel back the various layers around her, she struggles to realize the ultimate truth, painting a realistic picture of natural human skepticism. Readers who enjoy a suspenseful, many-layered story need look no further: pick up What Has Become of You.

–Ryan Monahan

Order your copy of What Has Become of You here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Snow Queen by Michael Cunningham.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
May 2014

140102185104-snowqueen-michaelcunninghamMichael Cunningham’s newest novel The Snow Queen chronicles two middle-aged brothers who search for meaning in a seemingly unfruitful and disappointing life. Years go by as the novel progresses, and the story follows the two inseparable brothers as they change and develop. Cunningham, author of six novels (including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Hours) has succeeded yet again in creating a captivating narrative that immerses the reader in the complex and changing lives of the two men.

Set in 2004, The Snow Queen’s opening scene features Barrett Meeks wandering alone through Central Park after yet another lost opportunity for love. Alone and depressed, Barrett witnesses what he can only describe as a miracle. Just a few feet above his head hovers a green orb of light that seems to address him as a god would address a mortal. Barrett, a lapsed Catholic, promptly returns to his religious roots and vows to find new a place in his life for God. Through religion and constant self-reflection, Barrett learns to cope with his seemingly diminishing opportunities for companionship, as well as gradually learning to accept what he considers an inconsequential life.

Meanwhile, in a dilapidated neighborhood in downtown New York at the Meeks’ home, Barrett’s older brother Tyler agonizes over the composition of the perfect wedding song for his gravely ill bride-to-be, Beth. Tyler seeks to compose a ballad that will not only express his eternal love, but will also serve as an acceptance of unescapable mortality. At 43, Tyler is becoming increasing pessimistic about his musical career, but increasingly convinced that he must achieve at least mild success as a songwriter. His reliance on drugs to achieve success alarms his friends and loved ones, but it seems impossible for him to escape the downward spiral.

The Snow Queen traces the Meeks’ brother’s progress over the years as they follow drastically different paths in the search for a deeper meaning of life. The conflicted, flawed characters that Cunningham creates struggle with their fleeting youth and the unique challenges of the 21st century, allowing a variety of readers to connect with the novel.

At once moving and inspiring, The Snow Queen stands apart as a tribute to the limitations of the human condition. In an eloquent and vivid narrative, Michael Cunningham prompts his readers to reflect on themselves and consider the significance of their life in regards to the greater human experience.

–Ryan Monahan

Order your copy of The Snow Queen here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

All At Once by C. K. Williams.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
April 2014

9780374216429_p0_v1_s260x420_zpsec031acb

Deliberately blurring the lines between microfiction and poetry, Pulitzer Prize winning poet C.K. Williams’ latest book All At Once does not simply hop back and forth across the definition but plays with what we define as narrative and abstraction, hallmarks of the mentioned forms. The title of the work itself even plays into the concept: everything is happening together, narrative being blown out by the language play of poetry and poetic structures being overtaken by narratives – often occurring in the same work. Williams’ narratives play on gaps of time and space, allowing the minimal use of narrative in these places to allow the more linguistic elements to perform, providing them an artifice in which to exist. By combining these elements into the same short pieces and combining all of these pieces into one book, Williams eschews the conventions of uniformity in a book by creating new unifications throughout the text. Like a good novel, elements forgotten reappear in a manner that expects the readers, despite their brief mention, to recall, however confusing the recollection may be. Like a good set of poems, Williams’ work builds until its penultimate section, “A Bedroom in Africa,” a longer piece but one made up of the elements that are found throughout the book. Whereas the piece after uses the flow of conversation as its form, “A Bedroom in Africa” expects the reader to be aware of the work that has come before it in the collection. This is not to say that “Sixty” does not require the same knowledge, but it requires it in a different manner, expecting the reader to have the experience of having read such widely ranging narratives and experiments in language.

-Amish Trevdi

Order your copy of All At Once here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

COLLECTED FRENCH POETRY, TRANSLATIONS. John Ashbury; edited by Roseanne Wasserman and Eugene Richie.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
April 2014

81BRyJODojL_zpsdf462c3a.jpg

Like its companion volume, dedicated to prose translations, this work amazes by its size and range. One hundred and seventy-one poems by twenty-five poets find themselves in elegant new English clothes. One virtue is that this range gives us a fairly thorough survey of the twentieth century, from the famously difficult Mallarmé and under-rated Jules Supervielle to contemporaries like Pascalle Monnier.

We’re familiar with Ashbery’s own poetry, of course, and his work is a singular moment in the history of American letters. He is prolific, but more importantly he doesn’t sound like anyone else. No one matches his gift for startling metaphor, for dislocating everyday life and prying loose something revelatory. To find his ilk we have to look, in fact, to early twentieth century French poets: Pierre Reverdy, René Char, Max Jacob. That’s why this new volume is so fitting; many of these translations seem to have come home, in a strange way, to Ashbery’s well-known idiom.

Sure enough, those three poets are translated here, along with that undisputed influence on Ashbery, Arthur Rimbaud (Ashbery’s translation of Rimbaud appeared as a book in 2011). But important poets—not well enough known in America—such as Paul Eluard and René Daumal also appear here. The editors, as with the prose translations of Ashbery (same publisher), have written a very extensive introduction which gives context not only to Ashbery’s knowledge of the French world but also to his entire poetic life.

Order your copy of COLLECTED FRENCH POETRY, TRANSLATIONS here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

COLLECTED FRENCH PROSE, TRANSLATIONS. John Ashbery; edited by Roasanne Wasserman and Eugene Richie.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
April 2014

9780374258030_p0_v2_s260x420_zps44059954

This remarkable volume is perhaps the place (even more than in the poetry translations) to discover Ashbery’s interest in French culture, along with his eclectic taste. After all, we know his poetry, and that he has translated French poetry (his brilliant versions of Rimbaud’s Illuminations appeared in 2011). A romp through the table of contents, guided by the gifted editors, shows Ashbery to be fascinated (he seems to shy away from “influenced”) by the French, and by the writings of playwrights, artists, musicians and critics—not just poets and fiction writers. Several unpublished or long-out-of-print writers are included.

Delightful to have Dalí’s essays, and to have one by surrealist Michel Leiris on Raymond Roussel. Roussel is one of the key figures in Ashbery’s introduction to French literature. The editors probe the possibility of Roussel’s influence; this writer of experimental fiction is one of the few in whom Ashbery admits some “resemblances” to his own work. The introduction to this volume carefully outlines Ashbery’s years in France, his friendships with writers such as the poet Pierre Martory, and the great variety of his cultural connections. The book is filled out by a bibliography and, even more usefully, a complete list of the first publication dates of the translated works.

As for the translations themselves, they are masterful: smooth, full of life and idiomatic.

Order your copy of COLLECTED FRENCH PROSE, TRANSLATIONS here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Strange Bodies by Marcel Theroux

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
February 2014

9780374270650_custom-e00f8a043145d1546a5

Marcel Theroux’s newest book Strange Bodies is a gripping novel that combines literature, science fiction, mystery, and philosophy. Theroux, a London novelist and author of four books (including 2010’s National Book Award finalist, Far North), writes a suspenseful tale that by the end will leave you questioning your own personal identity.

Strange Bodies tells the story of Nicholas Slopen, a recently divorced and impoverished scholar studying Dr. Samuel Johnson, the author of A Dictionary of English Language, published in 1755. Confined to a mental institution in 2009, Nicholas, narrating via journal to a friend, recalls his own death several months earlier, explaining that his consciousness survived his bodily death. From there begins his recounting of the events that led to his strange circumstances.

We learn that in April of that same year, Nicolas had been hired by an unassuming literary fanatic to examine several unpublished letters by Dr. Johnson. There were questions of authenticity, and accusations of forgery by a man seemingly displaced in the wrong century. From there, Nicholas begins to spiral into a world of conspiracy and literary mystery that, at surface level, appears to transcend time.

Readers who have a familiarity and passion for classical literature, especially that of Samuel Johnson and his contemporaries, will find Strange Bodies particularly thrilling. However, Theroux creates such a dynamic protagonist that any reader will find him or herself swept into the mysteries of Nicholas Slopen’s world, one that becomes instantly relatable. As you read Strange Bodies, you’ll find yourself pondering such questions as: What exactly constitutes a person’s consciousness? Does the death of a person’s body cause his or her identity to die? Theroux’s novel will suck you into the same world of conspiracy that Nicholas enters, and you’ll be unable to escape until the last page.

Order your copy of Strange Bodies here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Lost for Words by Edward St. Aubyn

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
May 2014

81SWxcTn3EL_zps031fbdca.jpg

It seems that at any social gathering of writers there is at least one person who will bring up the Patrick Melrose novels by Edward St. Aubyn. With passion and enthusiasm, our writer will explain that she is referring to a series of three short novels that track the life of a fictional contemporary English aristocrat named Patrick Melrose, paralleling the inner trajectories of Melrose’s life with that of the vestiges of an old world aristocracy in a modern world. But those themes and storylines are not the selling point for our passionate novelist. It is St. Aubyn’s writing. The way he crafts a sentence with an elegance and naturalness that divines yet rarely calls attention to itself. The biting humor that infects the sometimes wrenching parts of the narrative with the precise timing of a well-heeled comic. And not to be forgotten is Edward St. Aubyn’s precise negotiation of the spaces between empathy, satire, pathos, and farce.

Needless to say, when we saw Edward St. Aubyn’s upcoming novel, Lost for Words, on the upcoming release list, with subtlety and sleight-of-hand we moved it to the top of the reading pile. The novel is a send-up of the Man Booker Prize, the prestigious prize awarded to a novel from the Commonwealth of Nations, the Republic of Ireland, or Zimbabwe. (Note: beginning in 2014, the prize will expand its horizon to any novel from around the world, with the provision that it was written in English and published in the UK.) Throughout its almost half-century, the Booker has been a repository of controversy at both its longlist and shortlist phases, from public dissension among the judges to outcries from the finalists, burnished by complaints of conspiracies from book critics and close watchers. Through an ensemble cast, St. Aubyn (himself shortlisted for the 2006 Man Booker) weaves an amalgam of the storied controversies into a send-up that takes the reader into an over-the-top world that somehow still manages to stay scarily real.

In Lost for Words we have the Man Booker recast as the Elysian Prize, and, through alternating perspectives, we watch a repertory of interested players, from the individual judges to the writers to the publishers. It is a story of jockeying. Of greed. Of manipulation. And of course the seduction of power. It also is a novel that shows the objective for celebrating the art has little to do with the art, itself; instead, the goal is to see what can be appropriated from it. But as dire as that sounds, Lost for Words is a fun novel. All the players are exaggerated and just larger-than-life enough to be real characters without becoming caricatures. And St. Aubyn’s comedic timing is present throughout the whole novel. Some of the fictional excerpts from the novels being considered for the Elysian are alone worth the read.

Lost for Words may rely on some insider humor—it’s hard to say, as it sends up a world that we’re familiar with—but we relished every moment of it. We were glad we moved it right to the top of the nightstand pile.

Learn more about Edward St. Aubyn here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Can’t and Won’t: Stories by Lydia Davis

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
April 2014

61S1VCVBqVL_SL1500__zpsf02963bb.jpg

In her latest book, her fifth collection, Lydia Davis (winner of the 2013 Man Booker International Prize, a 2003 MacArthur fellow) forces us to examine our own definitions of fiction and narrative. Made up primarily of “stories” (however you define such a thing) which are a few paragraphs (mixed with some longer pieces), these mini-narratives often read more like prose poems than they do fiction, which urges us to ask whether we truly know where fiction ends and poetry begins. One begins to notice throughout that Davis often mixes humor with more mature statements on life, which is offset again the mixed of forms throughout the book. Occasionally there are letters or lists that read like a George Carlin joke. Often, pages are marked as “dreams” to tell us that these are not the rational thoughts of a mind but rather the liminal or subconscious mind poking through the surface. Don’t let the short pieces fool you: just because something takes less time does not mean it is easier to read the whole book. The short pieces are thought provoking, often leaving one asking larger questions of themselves. A rare book that is totally all right to put down and pick up at random intervals.

Order Can’t and Won’t here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Poetry of Derek Walcott 1948-2013, By Derek Walcott, (ed. Glyn Maxwell)

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
January 2014

c03b934bc28ca7f325879ac91d9bfa02_zps1c71

The Poetry of Derek Walcott 1948-2013 is slated for release later this January, and we are impossibly excited for its publication. This selection of Walcott’s poetry is both extensive and varied, spanning the entirety of his celebrated poetic career. A Nobel Prize winner and the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant and the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Walcott’s work is unquestionably one of the most important of our time. Edited by Glyn Maxwell, the volume includes some of Walcott’s most essential poems of the last sixty-five years, including “A Far Cry from Africa” and “Sixty Years After.” The collection’s chronological format allows the astute reader to trace Walcott’s personal and creative evolution from a tightly wound aesthetic style to his current looser and more settled forms. We’re eager to dive into poems that deal with the complicated themes that define Walcott’s work as they have defined his life: the meaning of identity; the ordeal of aging and loss; the painful consequences of colonialism on his island home of St. Lucia; the nature of love and faith; and, perhaps most significantly, the importance of honoring one’s own memory. Derek Walcott is one of the distinguished poets of our time, and with Maxwell’s careful selections it easy to see why Walcott’s work has resonated with readers for over half a century.

Order The Poetry of Derek Walcott, 1948-2013, here.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A Prayer Journal, by Flannery O’Connor (ed. W.A. Sessions)

Farrar, Straus and Giroux
November 2014

9780374236915_zpse045953e.jpg

Flannery O’Connor’s prolific, though short, life gave the world two novels and thirty-one short stories, as well as numerous craft essays. We have always loved her dry, unassuming wit, and her authentic southern characters. When we discovered that her personal journal from her time at the University of Iowa had been found among her papers in Georgia, we were excited to get our hands on it. Though we’ve always known O’Connor was a devout Catholic, her habit of poking fun at religious hypocrisy can cause us to forget that religion played a large role in her life. A Prayer Journal departs from what we’ve become accustomed to as O’Connor’s straightforward prose. Each entry is her own form of prayer, and we can see how much she looked to a higher power for inspiration. We were eager to read the introduction by W. A. Sessions, who knew O’Connor and elaborated on her frame of mind in 1946 and 1947, when she wrote in the journal. The most captivating part, however, might just be the facsimile of the journal itself that makes up the second half of the book. Being able to see O’Connor’s handwriting only adds to this rare glimpse into an amazing writer’s early insecurities, which is just one of the many reasons we’re so excited to read A Prayer Journal.

Order A Prayer Journalhere.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Book of Hours, by Kevin Young

Knopf
March 2014

414sS7zl6FL_AA160__zps8a593d7c.jpg

Award-winning poet Kevin Young’s eighth book, Book of Hours, is coming out in March of 2014, and we cannot wait for its release. The collection is an emotionally impactful examination of life’s vicissitudes, from the grief at the loss of Young’s father to the anticipation of his son’s birth. Travelling a spectrum of emotional material, Young maintains a difficult balance between deep emotion and lighthearted wit. For example, his descriptions of the bureaucracy and business of death are shockingly stark, all shown in order to capture the harsh procedural aspects of loss. Though Young’s poems pinpoint many of the hard moments, they are never unfeeling or uncomfortable—they’re just filled with a beautifully painful accuracy. He captures a wide and sensitive range of human emotions with a fresh and unique perspective while retaining a relatable universality. Book of Hours is nearly impossible to put down.

Order your copy of Book of Hourshere.

Also, be sure to visit Kevin Young’s website!

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bark, by Lorrie Moore

Knopf
March 2014

51msORtIceL_zpsc3639d0d.jpg

It would almost be odd not to say we were looking forward to Lorrie Moore’s upcoming book, a collection of stories called Bark. It would be odd for us not to immediately want to delve right into all eight short stories at once. We would be committing literary treason to not immediately note how seduced we were by opening lines from various pieces, such as, “Ira had been divorced for six months and still couldn’t get his wedding ring off (Debarking),” or “Although Kit and Raf had met in the peace movement, marching, organizing, and making no nukes signs, now they wanted to kill each other (Paper Losses),” or “The day following Michael Jackson’s death, I was constructing my own memorial (Thank You For Having Me).” We would be traitors to the cause of literature if we didn’t find ourselves laughing at Moore’s deadpan observations, such as when a billboard in the story Wings read HOSPICE CARE: IT’S NEVER TOO SOON TO CALL, and next to it “a traffic sign read PASS WITH CARE.” As Moore notes in the next sentence, “Surrealism could not be made up.” Yet as any reader of Lorrie Moore knows, her acute observations are ones that show the intimacy of the lives she is writing. Real people in real circumstances, trying their best to negotiate the personal with the political, wanting to make decisions in a world that too often is making decisions for them, and balancing their moral center against the temptations of all varieties of justification. And quite soon we realize that some of the stylistic hallmarks we might attribute to Moore are not really brushstrokes or casting or gilding; in fact more often than not they are the beautifully fractious ways lives are led. And that is but one short reason why we are looking forward to Bark. It just would be too odd not to.

Order your copy of Barkhere.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Facades, by Eric Lundgren

The Overlook Press
September 2013

thefacades_zps3a8aaa7f.jpg

Eric Lundgren’s debut novel will introduce readers to the dystopian ghost town of Trude. The book, which has already earned Lundgren comparisons to Franz Kafka, David Lynch, and Haruki Murakami, tells the tale of one man’s quest for his missing wife within the once thriving Midwestern city. We are very excited to explore the post-modernist back alleys and crumbling buildings of Trude through the eyes of Lundgren’s hapless legal clerk, Sven Norberg, and to encounter with him the shifty and subversive characters that pepper the book’s pages.  The Facades is an official selection of the 2013 Book Expo America Adult Editor’s Buzz Panel and the September 2013 Midwest Independent Booksellers Association Midwest Connection, and is the Fall 2013 Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Pick. And we add the book to one of our top picks of books we’re looking forward to reading.

Order The Facades from The Overlook Press.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A Permanent Member of the Family, by Russell Banks

Ecco Press
November 2013

permanent_member_of_family_zpsfa8776cf.j

Perhaps best known as one of our great living novelists, Russell Banks returns to the short story form in his soon-to-be-published collection, A Permanent Member of the Family. For nearly four decades, Banks has shown himself to be a writer who is an astute observer of the conflicts between the hopes and fears of well-meaning people, who, quite often, are ordinary people forced into difficult decisions placed upon them by extraordinary forces. We are anxious to read the twelve stories in this collection, fully anticipating that Russell Banks will introduce us to a whole new family of characters—all who are compelled to do the right things in their lives, but often forced to weigh the moral compromises that they will have to make to survive in a fragile and often difficult world. There are very few contemporary fiction writers who show us the America that we all live in as well as Banks. He is a master storyteller. As such, we can’t wait to read these twelve stories, all in one place, bound between two covers. In terms of upcoming fall releases, A Permanent Member of the Family tops our list.

Order A Permanent Member of the Family from Ecco Press.

Visit Russell Banks’ Website.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld, by Justin Hocking

Graywolf Press
March 2014

9781555976699_p0_v2_s260x420_zps7331c78c

First, in the literary journal The Normal School we read Justin Hocking’s essay, “All I Need Is This Thermos.” Second, we find out it’s from a forthcoming book. Third, we go on the lookout for the book we learn will be called The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld—A Memoir. Although we’ll have to wait until March 2014 for it to be published, now that we have had our hands on an advanced copy, we are finding that our excitement only is building. Hocking’s memoir centers on his relocation to New York City, and both the thrill and loneliness of being there. His initial salvation comes from joining the surfing community at Rockaway. But The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld is more than that. It is a book of obsessions. A book of New York. A book about community. A memoir of what it means to go inside one’s self and face the consequences of doing what it takes in order to survive in, and engage with, the outer world. Hocking’s memoir is structured as a series of short, connected essays. From what we’ve seen thus far, individually and as a whole, The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld is written with an immediacy that grabs us and pulls us in to Hocking’s world. Oh, and fourth, we couldn’t wait to tell you about it.

Keep checking Graywolf Press to order your copy.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

facebook_trimmed_zps597e8aea.png twitter_zpsa2ab1483.png

Connect with the RWU Library on Facebook and Twitter!

From the Nightstand: Adam Braver

Adam_Braver_zps29dfac9d.jpgabraver_books_zps64f848ed.jpgOver the past year, the “From the Nightstand” section of the Connecting With Your Library website has asked staff and faculty from around the RWU community to share the books they are reading, as well as recall meaningful reads from the past. Through these snapshots, we have seen a wide variety of titles, as vast as the campus community itself.As I look over at what my own nightstand has held this summer, among the many I see a half dozen biographies centered on an era of the 1930s I have been researching; the first volume of Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgård’s six-book autobiographical series that has been nothing short of a literary sensation this year; Thomas Beller’s smart and engaging essays on J.D. Salinger; Joanna Scott’s upcoming novel, De Potter’s Grand TourThe Snow Queen—a beautiful and haunting novel by Michael Cunningham; this year’s common reading, The CircleMy Grandfather’s Gallery—a biographical memoir about stolen art in Nazi occupied France; short stories and essays in various magazines and journals, as well as those sent to me by students from RWU and other workshops from over the years.

All of that is a way to say that as a new academic year is set to begin, all of us here at the library look forward to a new season of “From the Nightstand;” where we can be introduced to, and be inspired by, new books.

 

_________________________________________________

What are people in the Roger Williams University community reading? The From the Nightstand team asks which books are on people’s nightstands—either being read, or waiting to be read.

_________________________________________________

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

facebook_trimmed_zps597e8aea.png twitter_zpsa2ab1483.png

Connect with the RWU Library on Facebook and Twitter!