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Printing in the Library

 

 

 

 

Please refer to these helpful printing tips when printing in the library.

Students – Good luck on your exams and final projects for this semester.

Desktop Printing copy

Wireless Printing copy

ID Migration Update

By Linda Beith, Ph.D, Director of Instructional Design

The Instructional Design & Technologies team migrated two major instructional technology applications over the summer. The Bridges (Sakai) course management system was transferred to Longsight Inc., a new hosting vendor located in Ohio in August. In addition to migrating all the content and courses, Bridges was also upgraded to a new version which is now version 10.4. This upgrade contains many new features and improvements to existing functionality. Some of the highlights of the upgrade include:

  • Totally redesigned contextual help
  • Ability for group submissions in Assignments
  • Addition of peer rubrics to Assignments
  • Download of specific submissions in Assignment instead of the all submissions default
  • Ability to add comments made in Assignments to the Gradebook
  • Drag and drop file uploads in Resources (Chrome)
  • Audio recorder addition to the text editor
  • Ability to send a file to multiple student drop boxes at once
  • Addition of “joinable groups” for students to add themselves to a group
  • Improved calculated question type in Tests and Quizzes

For a full list of improvements and additions please see What’s New in Sakai 10?

The other major migration involved moving the Panopto Video Capture program from an on-campus server to the off-campus Panopto services. The Panopto application was also upgraded over the summer and removes the requirement for Silverlight to view videos. There is also a new feature that allows videos made in other programs and formats to be uploaded to the Panopto streaming server for distribution. Another big change in Panopto is the direct access through either Bridges My Workspace or through a Bridges course. This change will reduce confusion over access through multiple accounts and streamline logins. More information can be found on the Panopto 4.7 website.

What’s Your Favorite App?

We asked the Learning Commons staff to tell us what some of their favorite Apps are for their mobile and tablet devices.

 

Screen shot 2015-07-23 at 1.47.17 PM App: Google Maps

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“It keeps me from getting lost (most of the time).” -Linda Beith, Instructional Design

 

logo-iconApp: What’sApp

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“I like it because I can communicate with my friends and family when we travel internationally. You can send pictures, videos, and text messages for free.”  -Jackie Katz, Library

 

 

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App: Scrabble & Around Me

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“My favorite app is the Scrabble app. I’m not sure if it’s available for android devices because I don’t have one. It’s free for my IPhone and IPad, and I like it because I love playing, and I can play by myself (unlike Words with Friends), I can play anytime (waiting in line for anything), and it’s mentally stimulating. I also like “Around Me” which is free for Apple devices. It arranges businesses by categories (banks, bars, coffee shops, hotels, etc.) that are near your current location. So if I need gas or a TJ Maxx, I simply use the category or fill in the search box and I’ll get the location and directions…and now it also provides the weather. A very useful app, especially if you’re in an unfamiliar location.”  -Barbara Kenney, Library

 

Screen shot 2015-07-23 at 1.50.57 PM Screen shot 2015-07-23 at 1.50.42 PMApp: Pandora & Notes

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“My favorite apps are probably boring but here they are.  I like Pandora (the free one, unfortunately with advertisements) I just plug into it and find soothing music as I work.  It does not disturb anyone as they cannot hear it.   Then I use the NOTES app for reminders and grocery lists.”  -Barbara Flanders, Library

 

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App: The Simpsons Tapped Out

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free!

“It’s very, very fun and a well-designed app.”  -Ethan Nemkovich, Media Services

 

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App: Plant Nanny

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“Plant Nanny combines health with fun to remind you to drink water regularly.  The cute plant keeps you company ever day by living in your phone.  In order to keep it alive and help it grow, you must give it water at certain periods of time”.  Drink water when your plant does and you will stay hydrated.  Fun for all ages!  -Karen Jones, Technology Support Services

 

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App: Yoga Studio & IMDB

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Yoga Studio – $3.99, IMDB –Free

“My favorite app for my iPad is called Yoga Studio.  I get tired of doing yoga DVDs as they are limited to one or a few workouts.  Yoga Studio has beginner, intermediate and advanced classes ranging from 15 to 60 minutes. There are over 100 classes on the app.  Some are specialized for back pain, for runners, etc. The narrator’s voice is a little annoying, but you get used to her! Another favorite is IMDB for film-buffs.  Tons of information related to films!”  -Betsy Learned, Library

 

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App: Waze

Platform: Apple/Android /Windows Phones

Cost: Free

“Waze is a community-based navigation app that provides drivers with real time road conditions, hazards, traffic jams and police locations. I find it really helpful to avoid traffic jams before I hit them. The app will even reroute you to avoid sitting in traffic.”  -Megan Lessard, Library

 

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App: Couch to 5k

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: $2

“I used this app a while back to get started/used to running before participating in 5Ks and my first Tough Mudder. I liked the fact that it gradually worked you up from barely being able to run to running for a half hour straight without keeling over. It was an additional bonus that it played my music for me and had voice prompts/encouragement to go along with the workout.”  -Chris Truszkowski, Library

 

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App: GoToMeeting/GoToTraining

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost:  Free

“A great synchronous online tool!”  –Kevin O’Rourke, Instructional Design

 

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App: Instagram

Platform: Apple/Android

Cost: Free

“I love taking and sharing pictures. A lot of times they end up being funny pictures of my cat, or cool adventure spots around New England.” –Hannah Goodall, Library

 

 Did we miss one of your favorite apps? Leave us your pick in the comments!

 

Essential Tips for Taking Exams on Bridges

By Linda Beith, Director of Instructional Design

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As the end of the semester approaches students may be asked to take a final exam on Bridges. Here are some tips to assure a successful submission:
1.       Use a reliable Internet connection – preferably wired. Wireless connections, especially in a residence hall, can drop unexpectedly and cause a disconnection from the exam.
2.      Avoid using a mobile device – use a wired laptop or desktop computer
3.      Don’t open multiple browser windows
4.      Use Bridges built-in navigation – don’t use the browser’s back button. If exam questions are set up on individual pages, use the supplied Next and Back buttons in the exam. Note: if there are no options for Next and Back buttons this means it is not allowed to return to a question. In this case any attempt to use the browser’s back button will cause the exam to disconnect.
5.      Use Chrome or Firefox browsers as the most dependable
6.      Pay attention to any time limits set on the test
7.      Save your work often. If the test displays one question per page always click on Save before moving to the next screen. Until the exam is submitted for grading a question can be changed at any time. If the test displays multiple questions on a page or if there is an essay question included periodically scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Save. There is a timeout period on Bridges of 90 minutes so clicking Save often keeps the system from logging out.
8.      Wait for the Submission Confirmation that is generated when the Submit for Grading button at the end of the exam is clicked to make sure all the answers are saved.

For more in-depth information please review the Essential Tips for Taking Online Tests. If you have any questions about taking exams on Bridges please contact the Instructional Design team at 401-254-3187 or via email at id@rwu.edu.

#4 DOCS@RWU: Servicing Students and Faculty with Open Access Textbooks

Did you know that the Library has had a digital repository called DOCS@RWU since 2006? DOCS@RWU is a library service that provides open access to an online collection of scholarly and creative works produced by faculty, students and other members of the RWU community. It currently hosts 3,049 papers and other materials in multi-media format, including but not limited to online journals, faculty publications, student theses, and image galleries. Thanks to its rich and interesting content, DOCS@RWU has yielded 400,894 full-text downloads to date since its inauguration. As a matter of fact, there are many ways for DOCS@RWU to boost scholarly communication and to showcase your research as well as academic achievements. We will introduce to you one amazing thing about DOCS@RWU every month this year to demonstrate why DOCS@RWU should matter to you!

 

#4 DOCS@RWU: Servicing Students and Faculty with Open Access Textbooks

by Mary Wu, Digital Scholarship/Metadata Librarian

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The movement of open educational resources (OERs) has been recently gaining huge momentum in higher education. OERs are materials for teaching, learning, and researching. They are available in the public domain or are released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation and distribution. OERs’ aim is to deliver universal access to greater education, share vital information, and inspire intellectual dialogue and collaboration. OERs include lesson plans, lectures, curriculum materials, and, of course, textbooks.

Authors of textbooks are often faculty members of a higher education institution. They develop resources for their own teaching and make them available to other teachers and classes, as well as their own students. Since the price of textbooks is skyrocketing, open textbooks help reduce the financial burden for an education by providing students and faculty with alternatives to full-priced textbooks.

Open access textbooks are a perfect fit for the digital repository platform, and housing them within it brings numerous benefits to the generous faculty authors who write them and the institutions that support them. It makes perfect sense for the original creators, professors, and students to be able to access these textbooks directly through their own libraries’ infrastructures. The discoverability that is built into the digital repository platform helps to make these textbooks accessible to students, faculty and readers across the world. It also boosts the research profile of the institution and showcases the research, teaching and service of faculty authors. Below are two examples of digital repositories that host open access textbooks:

University of South Florida: http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/oa_textbooks/

 

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Grand Valley State University: http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/books/

If you would like to include your work in DOCS@RWU, or use the platform to publish, please contact Mary Wu (mwu@rwu.edu), the Digital Scholarship/Metadata Librarian.

Stay tuned for the next cool thing that DOCS@RWU can do for you!

Policy Map

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rCloud and Library Databases

If you have an rCloud account, you’re in luck! Especially if you are a distance student. Once you login to your rCloud account it will be just like being on campus. You can access library databases simply and easily from the library home page at http://library.rwu.edu or from your course guide. Don’t have an rCloud account yet? No worries – you can still log-in to library databases from off campus with your library barcode found on the back of your student ID. If you don’t have a student ID and need a library barcode, just contact us at 401-254-3375 or libref@rwu.edu.

Global Road Warrior

 

Global Road Warrior is a database that you can access through the RWU Library website; it provides a wealth of information about countries including economic and demographic data. Whether you are traveling abroad or researching a country or region for a paper… Global Road Warrior will be able to help you with all your needs.

Please explore the Global Road Warrior Database through this link:

http://library.rwu.edu/lib/research/databases/list/g?subject=All

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Cool Things the Digital Repository DOCS@RWU Can Do

by Mary Wu, Digital Scholarship and Metadata Librarian

 

Did you know that the Library has had a digital repository called DOCS@RWU since 2006? DOCS@RWU is a library service that provides open access to an online collection of scholarly and creative works produced by faculty, students and other members of the RWU community. It currently hosts 3,049 papers and other materials in multi-media formats, including but not limited to online journals, faculty publications, student theses, and image galleries. Thanks to its rich and interesting content, DOCS@RWU has yielded 400,894 full-text downloads to date since its inauguration. As a matter of fact, there are many ways for DOCS@RWU to boost scholarly communication and to showcase your research as well as academic achievements. We will introduce to you one amazing thing about DOCS@RWU every month this year to demonstrate why DOCS@RWU should matter to you!

 

#3 DOCS@RWU: A Journal Publishing Platform

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Designed to foster knowledge creation and dissemination, DOCS@RWU is equipped with full-fledged journal publishing capabilities and can serve as a platform for online journal publishing programs.  The topic, scope, and frequency of these journals are determined by their editorial boards, generally consisting of RWU faculty and students.  Creative and literary works, student research projects, and conference proceedings are some examples of possible journal content.  In addition, DOCS@RWU can be utilized as an online publishing platform for established RWU journals and journals affiliated with RWU faculty, but not currently based at RWU.  Considering the amount of time and technical skills required to set up and maintain an online journal, the Library provides assistance in the management of journals published on DOCS@RWU according to each journal’s specifications, including journal homepage design, implementing a submission and review process, and installing an RSS feed. We believe that a library-based publishing service will expand the scholarly communication channel by providing alternatives to traditional publishing services.  More importantly, our students will gain first-hand experience in the full range of the scholarly production cycle, from conducting research to publishing its results. Currently there are three live journals on DOCS@RWU. They are:

 

 

Many academic libraries across the country are hosting journals on their digital repository platforms and even extending the service further in the form of library presses. Below are a few examples that demonstrate how DOCS@RWU can help make high quality professional publishing more efficient and affordable:

 

Journal of the Civil War Era publishes annually undergraduate papers, including academic essays, public history essays, and book reviews on the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College.

 

Res Publica is a journal of undergraduate research published by the Political Science Honorary Society and funded by the Student Senate at Illinois Wesleyan University.

 

Zea e-books is a digital and print-on-demand publishing service provided by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries.

 

If you would like to include your work in DOCS@RWU, or use the platform to publish, please contact Mary Wu (mwu@rwu.edu), the Digital Scholarship/Metadata Librarian.

 

Stay tuned for the next cool thing that DOCS@RWU can do for you! Also check out the February Connections for #2 DOCS@RWU: A Showcase for RWU Faculty Work.

 

While You Were Away in January…

By Linda Beith, Director of Instructional Design

The Instructional Design team was busy in the month of January upgrading four major instructional technologies including Bridges learning management system, Panopto video capture, Citrix GoToMeeting/GoToTraining web conferencing and PollEverywhere virtual clickers. The ID team also conducted another session over winter break of the Teaching Online short course for faculty interested in transitioning from teaching on campus to teaching online.

 

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What’s New in Bridges

Some faculty will notice a new look to their Bridges courses. The School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation, the School of Continuing Studies and the Law School Bridges courses each have a new and unique look. The plan is to eventually add more choices for faculty to change the look and feel of their courses.

Notable tools added to Bridges include a Drop Box to collect electronic student work and Page Order tool to allow faculty to re-order their course menu items and hide tools from student view.

I.D.E.A. SPACE

The Instructional Technology Development Center has been replaced with a new area on the first floor of the Learning Commons. This room is called the Instructional Design Education and Application (I.D.E.A.) space and the intent is to provide a space for faculty to develop materials and learn new technologies in consultation with the Instructional Design team. For more information contact the Instructional Design team at id@rwu.edu or phone 401-254-3187.